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Re: New -base release?


From: Sebastian Reitenbach
Subject: Re: New -base release?
Date: Tue, 16 Aug 2011 09:21:41 +0200
User-agent: SOGoMail 1.3.8

 
On Tuesday, August 16, 2011 09:01 CEST, Riccardo Mottola <address@hidden> 
wrote: 
 
> Hi
> >> How do you find the timezone on Free/Open BSD?  What we need for timezone 
> >> support is some way to obtain, from the operating system, the correct 
> >> timezone name (eg. GB-Eire or Europe/Rome)
> >> There's no standard way to do that, so we already have system-specific 
> >> code to get the info via the most common methods, and there's no real 
> >> reason we can't add more for other OS's.
> >>      
> > At least speaking for OpenBSD, /etc/localtime is a symlink to the timezone. 
> > For me it looks like this:
> > $ ls -l /etc/localtime
> > lrwxr-xr-x  1 root  wheel  33 Feb 20 11:02 /etc/localtime ->  
> > /usr/share/zoneinfo/Europe/Berlin
> >
> >
> >    
> yes, that's pretty standard. /etc/localtime can be both a link or just a 
> raw copy.
> 
> do a "file /usr/share/zoneinfo/Europe/Berlin"
> 
> and you should see the timezone data file version.

Seems I have the new version:

file Berlin 
Berlin: timezone data, version 2, 8 gmt time flags, 8 std time flags, no leap 
seconds, 144 transition times, 8 abbreviation chars


> 
> It appears I have both "old version" and "version 2" floating around. We 
> are able to use version 2 files but not the old ones on freebsd. But I 
> couldn't really understand inside the NSTimeZone code where we do read 
> the contents of the file.
> 
> *light bulb on* ! Perhaps we do not read the conent, but we assume it is 
> a symlink? I tried switching versions using a symlink and not by copying 
> again.... I need to test that too. Darn.
> 
> Riccardo
 
 
 
 



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