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Re: GPL 2(b) HUH?


From: Rjack
Subject: Re: GPL 2(b) HUH?
Date: Sat, 20 Sep 2008 08:44:46 -0500
User-agent: Thunderbird 2.0.0.16 (Windows/20080708)

Rahul Dhesi wrote:
Rjack <address@hidden> writes:

The square brackets are a "signal" used in legal citations to *indicate* that the original quote has in some manner been altered.
 In the case at hand the square brackets surrounding "[T]he first.
. ." is a signal that the proceeding introductory phrase has been skipped.

What's the signal that the skipping of the phrase has changed the meaning of the text?

There is no signal for "... that the skipping of the phrase has
changed the meaning of the text". The meaning is a matter for the
reader to either accept or rebut as he reviews the citation and
its context -- the citation is open for full and fair rebuttal.
What it is *not* open is the false claims of "deception" for the
citation being "out of context" -- the federal courts routinely
uses the same citation rules. The square brackets are full and
fair warning that the citation is altered.

So. . . lets get back to the heart of your posted complaint:

"If you look under other subject headings, not just this one, I'm
sure you will find where I pointed out that you took a sentence
that began "On every writ of error or appeal, the first and
fundamental question is that of jurisdiction..." and quoted it
without the "On every writ of error or appeal" part, thus making
it much more general than it was intended to be."

You are certainly free to argue that jurisdiction is *not*
intended to be a fundamental "general" requirement of the federal
courts: ". . . thus making it much more general than it was
intended to be."

Let the group's readers decide this matter for themselves based
upon what you and I have respectively posted.

Sincerely,
Rjack :)

PS: I think your next argument, "That's really not what I meant"
will truly demonstrate the spirit of William Jefferson Clinton:
"That depends on what the meaning of 'is' is".


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