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Re: Now it's my compiler!


From: Rjack
Subject: Re: Now it's my compiler!
Date: Fri, 26 Sep 2008 18:52:58 -0500
User-agent: Thunderbird 2.0.0.17 (Windows/20080914)

The Ghost In The Machine wrote:
On Sep 25, 8:22 pm, Hyman Rosen <address@hidden> wrote:
Rjack wrote:
You don't have to say anything at all about your compiler.
Do so!

http://www.gnu.org/licenses/gpl.html

<begin excerpts>

The “Corresponding Source” for a work in object code form means
all the source code needed to generate, install, and (for an
executable work) run the object code and to modify the work,
including scripts to control those activities. However, it does
not include the work's System Libraries, or general-purpose tools
or generally available free programs which are used unmodified in
performing those activities but which are not part of the work.
. . .

[b] does NOT need to provide any information/media/software
regarding his compilation environment beyond that needed for a
runnable distribution of any derived/compiled product, though it
may need to identify the proper environment (e.g., icc on an
x86).

http://www.softwarefreedom.org/resources/2008/compliance-guide.html

 <begin excerpt>

4.2.3  What About the Compiler?
. . .
If you have used a proprietary, third-party compiler to build the
software, then you probably cannot ship it to your customers. We
consider the name of the compiler, its exact version number, and
where it can be acquired as information that *must be provided as
part of the Corresponding Source*. This information is essential to
anyone who wishes to produce a binary. It is not the intent of the
GPL to require you to distribute third-party software tools to your
customer (provided the tools themselves are not based on the GPL’d
software shipped), but *we do believe it requires* that you give the
user all the essential non-proprietary facts that you had at your
disposal to build the software. Therefore, if you choose not to
distribute the compiler, you should include a readme about where you
got it, what version it was, and who to contact to acquire it,
regardless of whether your compiler is FOSS, proprietary, or
internally developed.

Sincerely,
Rjack :)


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