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set in. "We heard a powerful and eloquent silence, " said Chuck P. Diamo


From: keith . sprochi
Subject: set in. "We heard a powerful and eloquent silence, " said Chuck P. Diamond, a litigator with O'Melveny & Myers in Los Angeles, who with his wife, Linda Smith, is representing AMD.
Date: Tue, 6 Sep 2005 13:14:27 -0400 (EDT)

--text follows this line--
This bug report will be sent to the Free Software Foundation,
not to your local site managers!
Please write in English, because the Emacs maintainers do not have
translators to read other languages for them.

Your bug report will be posted to the address@hidden mailing list,
and to the gnu.emacs.bug news group.

In GNU Emacs 21.3.1 (i686-pc-linux-gnu)
 of 2004-11-23 on ksprochi-lx02
configured using `configure  --prefix=/opt/emacs --with-gcc --with-x=no'
Important settings:
  value of $LC_ALL: nil
  value of $LC_COLLATE: en_US
  value of $LC_CTYPE: en_US
  value of $LC_MESSAGES: en_US
  value of $LC_MONETARY: en_US
  value of $LC_NUMERIC: en_US
  value of $LC_TIME: en_US
  value of $LANG: en_US
  locale-coding-system: iso-latin-1
  default-enable-multibyte-characters: t

Please describe exactly what actions triggered the bug
and the precise symptoms of the bug:
====================================================================================================
(Everything I have included is wrapped by the ===========...)

I am creating a trivial data transfer object Java class, and the buffer 
contents were:


----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
public class Data {

    public static final String from    = "address@hidden";
    public static final String to      = "address@hidden";
    public static final String message = 



"Associated Press\nUpdate 7: Oil, Gas Prices Drop As Markets Calm 
Down\n09.06.2005,06:41 AM\n\nOil and gasoline prices dropped Tuesday as calm 
returned to markets after last weeks decision by industrialized nations to 
release 60 million barrels of crude from strategic stockpiles as the U.S. oil 
industry struggled to recover from Hurricane Katrina.\n\nStill, analysts said 
there were several factors that could force prices to rise, even if 
crude-supply worries decrease. And the long-term effects of Katrinas damage are 
likely to exacerbate refineries problems in meeting demand for gasoline and 
other petroleum products.\n\nLight, sweet crude oil for October delivery fell 
79 cents by midday in Europe to $66.78 a barrel in electronic trading on the 
New York Mercantile Exchange, which was closed Monday for the U.S. Labor Day 
holiday. It closed Friday at $67.57 a barrel.\n\nUnleaded gas was down just 
over 4 cents to $2.1410 a gallon, while heating oil was down nearly 3 cents to 
$2.06
 30 a gallon.\n\nBrent crude, which had already corrected downward in trading 
Monday, was up 41 cents at $65.26.\n\nThe International Energy Agency announced 
Friday that its 26 members would draw on 2 million barrels a day of oil 
reserves over the next 30 days - for a total of 60 million barrels - to help 
offset the loss of output and refining capacity in the U.S. caused by Hurricane 
Katrina, and restore confidence in the market.\n\nJapan, a member of the 
Paris-based IEA, said on Tuesday that starting Wednesday it would release to 
the market about 200,000 barrels a day of crude oil and refined products from 
its oil reserves held by private refiners, according to Shoichi Nakagawa, 
minister of Economy, Trade and Industry.\n\nAll told, Japan will free a total 
of 7.3 million barrels over the next 30 days in accordance with Japans share 
set by the IEA.\n\n        Two storm-shuttered facilities in the United States 
restarted and flows of crude oil improved enough to allow refinerie
 s in the Gulf Coast and Midwest to ramp up production. But four damaged Gulf 
Coast refineries look likely to remain shut for weeks or even months, taking 
with them more than 5 percent of U.S. capacity.\n\n            Despite the 
steps by industrialized nations to avert a fuel shortage, analysts warned that 
long lines at U.S. gasoline pumps and record prices could augur higher oil 
costs in the months ahead.\n\nWith nearly three months to go until the end of 
the Atlantic hurricane season, which peaks between mid-September and 
mid-October, more storms - both real and metaphorical - could be on the 
horizon, Energy Intelligence said on its Web site.\n\nEnergy analyst Orrin 
Middleton of Barclays Capital in London said the price relief was likely 
temporary because of concerns about refinery capacities.\n\nThe huge rally we 
got last week shows that its a product more than a crude problem, he said. I 
dont think further OPEC crude is going to alleviate the refinery problem.\n\nHe 
was 
 alluding to comments from OPEC oil ministers suggesting the organization was 
considering raising its ceiling by up to 1 million barrels when it meets in 
Vienna next week.\n\n            Rafael Ramirez, Venezuelas oil minister, said 
his country will follow through on its offer to send 1 million barrels of 
gasoline to the United States as soon as possible to help victims of Hurricane 
Katrina. Ramirez reiterated the pledge on Monday while at an oil meeting in 
Jamaica.\n\nVenezuela and Caribbean leaders are close to finalizing deals to 
supply the region with oil from the South American nation under preferential 
terms.\n\nVenezuelan President Hugo Chavez was to meet Tuesday in Jamaica with 
officials from 16 Caribbean countries, and was expected to sign accords 
establishing the financing and other details of his Petrocaribe 
initiative.\n\nChavez has said Venezuela, the worlds fifth largest oil 
exporter, will donate nearly $20 million to help islands build loading docks 
and fuel st
 orage depots so they can easily receive fuel.\n\n_\n\nAssociated Press Writer 
Christopher Torchia in Singapore contributed to this report.\n

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Then I pasted an article from Forbes.com 
(http://www.forbes.com/home/free_forbes/2005/0905/054.html) and this bug window 
showed up (with all of the stuff outside the ========...)

Now my buffer containing my Java class looks like this:


----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
public class Data {

    public static final String from    = "address@hidden";
    public static final String to      = "address@hidden";
    public static final String message = 



"Associated Press\nUpdate 7: Oil, Gas Prices Drop As Markets Calm 
Down\n09.06.2005,06:41 AM\n\nOil and gasoline prices dropped Tuesday as calm 
returned to markets after last weeks decision by industrialized nations to 
release 60 million barrels of crude from strategic stockpiles as the U.S. oil 
industry struggled to recover from Hurricane Katrina.\n\nStill, analysts said 
there were several factors that could force prices to rise, even if 
crude-supply worries decrease. And the long-term effects of Katrinas damage are 
likely to exacerbate refineries problems in meeting demand for gasoline and 
other petroleum products.\n\nLight, sweet crude oil for October delivery fell 
79 cents by midday in Europe to $66.78 a barrel in electronic trading on the 
New York Mercantile Exchange, which was closed Monday for the U.S. Labor Day 
holiday. It closed Friday at $67.57 a barrel.\n\nUnleaded gas was down just 
over 4 cents to $2.1410 a gallon, while heating oil was down nearly 3 cents to 
$2.06
 30 a gallon.\n\nBrent crude, which had already corrected downward in trading 
Monday, was up 41 cents at $65.26.\n\nThe International Energy Agency announced 
Friday that its 26 members would draw on 2 million barrels a day of oil 
reserves over the next 30 days - for a total of 60 million barrels - to help 
offset the loss of output and refining capacity in the U.S. caused by Hurricane 
Katrina, and restore confidence in the market.\n\nJapan, a member of the 
Paris-based IEA, said on Tuesday that starting Wednesday it would release to 
the market about 200,000 barrels a day of crude oil and refined products from 
its oil reserves held by private refiners, according to Shoichi Nakagawa, 
minister of Economy, Trade and Industry.\n\nAll told, Japan will free a total 
of 7.3 million barrels over the next 30 days in accordance with Japans share 
set by the IEA.\n\n        Two storm-shuttered facilities in the United States 
restarted and flows of crude oil improved enough to allow refinerie
 s in the Gulf Coast and Midwest to ramp up production. But four damaged Gulf 
Coast refineries look likely to remain shut for weeks or even months, taking 
with them more than 5 percent of U.S. capacity.\n\n            Despite the 
steps by industrialized nations to avert a fuel shortage, analysts warned that 
long lines at U.S. gasoline pumps and record prices could augur higher oil 
costs in the months ahead.\n\nWith nearly three months to go until the end of 
the Atlantic hurricane season, which peaks between mid-September and 
mid-October, more storms - both real and metaphorical - could be on the 
horizon, Energy Intelligence said on its Web site.\n\nEnergy analyst Orrin 
Middleton of Barclays Capital in London said the price relief was likely 
temporary because of concerns about refinery capacities.\n\nThe huge rally we 
got last week shows that its a product more than a crude problem, he said. I 
dont think further OPEC crude is going to alleviate the refinery problem.\n\nHe 
was 
 alluding to comments from OPEC oil ministers suggesting the organization was 
considering raising its ceiling by up to 1 million barrels when it meets in 
Vienna next week.\n\n            Rafael Ramirez, Venezuelas oil minister, said 
his country will follow through on its offer to send 1 million barrels of 
gasoline to the United States as soon as possible to help victims of Hurricane 
Katrina. Ramirez reiterated the pledge on Monday while at an oil meeting in 
Jamaica.\n\nVenezuela and Caribbean leaders are close to finalizing deals to 
supply the region with oil from the South American nation under preferential 
terms.\n\nVenezuelan President Hugo Chavez was to meet Tuesday in Jamaica with 
officials from 16 Caribbean countries, and was expected to sign accords 
establishing the financing and other details of his Petrocaribe 
initiative.\n\nChavez has said Venezuela, the worlds fifth largest oil 
exporter, will donate nearly $20 million to help islands build loading docks 
and fuel st
 orage depots so they can easily receive fuel.\n\n_\n\nAssociated Press Writer 
Christopher Torchia in Singapore contributed to this report.\nIf you believe 
AMD's colorful allegations, Intel has done a great job of gagging the computer 
industry.
Before Advanced Micro Devices filed its lawsuit against Intel in June alleging 
monumental amounts of bullying behavior, the perennially number two computer 
chip maker tried hard to get a big name in its corner to verify its claims 
publicly. AMD's indomitable leader, Hector Ruiz, worked the phones for days. 
But nobody accepted his invitation to moon the emperor.

That left AMD to beat its own drum as loudly as possible. The lawsuit itself 
was written for maximum effect, claiming that Intel intimidated Hewlett-Packard 
into refusing 840,000 free AMD microprocessors; that Toshiba used Intel rebates 
like "cocaine"; that Intel salesmen beat Gateway into "guacamole"; and that 
Intel put a "gun to the head" of then-Compaq chief executive Michael Capellas.

The litany of alleged abuse brought no corroborators out of the wings, even 
though the bullied big shots--HP's Carleton Fiorina, Compaq's Capellas and 
Gateway's Theodore Waitt--have little to lose from snitching. They're all gone 
from the industry. Intel won't comment on the complaint, filed in federal 
district court in Delaware, except to say that it hopes to fight in court, 
rather than in public.

AMD, which has litigated on and off with Intel for 20 years, says omert
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

The rest of this message was created by Emacs
====================================================================================================
"If you're a customer, why go out of your way to say something when you can be 
forced to say something in court," said Sangeeth Peruri, an analyst with J&W 
Seligman, which owns 10million shares of AMD and 2 million of Intel.

Court seems to be where this battle is headed, adding to what must be a big 
legal bill at Intel. In March it agreed to a ruling by Japan's fair trade 
commission to settle a dispute over anticompetitive sales practices. (Intel 
denies any unlawful conduct.) The European Union and the Korean Fair Trade 
Commission are now investigating Intel on similar charges. In July EUregulators 
raided Intel offices in Milan, Munich, London and Madrid. Since AMD sued, 61 
me-too class actions have been filed in state and federal courts.

If AMD gets Intel to court, odds would still be long that a PC executive would 
stick his neck out on this one. With the exception of Dell, PC makers have 2% 
operating margins; Intel's are 40%. One missed shipment of Pentiums can kill an 
entire quarter for a wayward customer.

While AMDwould love to have some heavyweights visibly on its side--as Netscape 
had Sun and Apple during the Microsoft antitrust trial--it may have to settle 
for finding a pattern of documentary evidence while digging through the hard 
drives of an estimated 800 people at 37 companies, plus whatever Intel coughs 
up.

Says Diamond: "I'm hoping to find the guacamole e-mail."


Recent input:
r a t h e r SPC t h a n SPC i n SPC p u b l i c . RET 
RET A M D , SPC w h i c h SPC h a s SPC l i t i g a 
t e d SPC o n SPC a n d SPC o f f SPC w i t h SPC I 
n t e l SPC f o r SPC 2 0 SPC y e a r s , SPC s a y 
s SPC o m e r t M-` SPC h a s

Recent messages:
Replaced 8 occurrences
Mark set
Auto-saving...done
Wrote /home/ksprochi/proto/Data.java
(No changes need to be saved) [6 times]
keyboard-quit: Quit [2 times]
(No changes need to be saved)
Loading tmm...done
Loading view...done
Loading emacsbug...done




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