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bug#2435: Bug 2435


From: Kenichi Handa
Subject: bug#2435: Bug 2435
Date: Wed, 04 Mar 2009 11:16:53 +0900

In article <address@hidden>, Chong Yidong <address@hidden> writes:

>>> emacs -Q
>>> M-x customize-group RET whitespace RET
>>> C-v C-v
> >
> > I can't reproduce the crash with that.

> It doesn't happen all the time---about once every three or four
> attempts.  Quite strange.

I tried more than 10 times without crash.

> >   2846                      if (many_times_ok)
> >   2847                        {
> >   2848                          boolean simple = skip_one_char (laststart) 
> > == b;
> >   2849                          unsigned int startoffset = 0;
> >   2850                          re_opcode_t ofj =
> >   2851                            /* Check if the loop can match the empty 
> > string.  */
> >   2852                            (simple || !analyse_first (laststart, b, 
> > NULL, 0))
> >   2853                            ? on_failure_jump : on_failure_jump_loop;
> >
> > Here, "simple" is always set to 1, so analyse_first is not
> > called.

> When I get the crash, simple is set to 0.

> (gdb) p b
> $4 = (unsigned char *) 0x8b927b7 ""
> (gdb) p laststart
> $5 = (unsigned char *) 0x8b92786 "\a\201\f"

That is different in my case.  When the execution reaches
the above code (three or four times while displaying that
Tibetan char), laststart is always "\004\200".  Here the
first byte \004 means `charset' OP, and that is reasonable
because we are now handling '*' after "[...]".  

But '\a' (== 7 == stop_memory) is very strange.  Please show
me these values when simple is set to 0.

(gdb) p bufp->buffer
$58 = (unsigned char *) 0xa905aa0 "\004\200"
(gdb) p laststart
$59 = (unsigned char *) 0xa905ab2 "\004\200"
(gdb) p bufp->buffer[0]@(b - bufp->buffer)
$60 = "address@hidden"
(gdb) p laststart[0]@(b-laststart)
$61 = 
"\004\200\000\000\004\000\220\017\000\271\017\000\272\017\000\272\017\000\273\017\000\273\017\000\274\017\000\274\017"

Here,
  "\220\017\000" => 0xF90
  "\271\017\000" => 0xFB9
  "\272\017\000" => 0xFBA
  "\273\017\000" => 0xFBB
  "\274\017\000" => 0xFBC

So, we are now processing the '*' just after the second
[...] of tibetan-composable-pattern.

---
Kenichi Handa
address@hidden






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