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Re: Objective-C 2.0 and other new features in Leopard


From: Lars Sonchocky-Helldorf
Subject: Re: Objective-C 2.0 and other new features in Leopard
Date: Sat, 10 Nov 2007 22:52:43 +0100


Am 10.11.2007 um 17:37 schrieb Stefan Bidigaray:

On Nov 10, 2007 10:43 AM, Jesse Ross <address@hidden> wrote:
Call me cynical, but coming up with a slogan doesn't really seem like
a solution to the issues that we're having. We need developers, plain
and simple. In order to get developers, we need positive exposure.
That's not going to happen by pushing what amounts to marketing-
speak. Positive exposure is only going to come from building
powerful, innovative applications that make use of GNUstep. We need,
to put it bluntly, "killer apps".

I agree, but this is one of those the chicken and the egg problems. In order for a developer to want to write a killer app for GNUstep, GNUstep must have a large user base, but in order for GNUstep to have a large user base there must be a kill app.

Psychologically, a slogan is a must. There's a reason why every company has a marketing department.

You're also assuming people even know what GNUstep is. Every time GNUstep does something news worth (like a new release posted on OSNews) someone writes something along the lines: "GNUstep has a new release, great, I've been using WindowMaker for years and love it." As far as most people know, GNUstep doesn't even exist.

Obviously a slogan isn't going to do anything on it's own, but if you think about it, it's just a phrase, how hard would it be to edit the current logo to include it?

Same opinion here. While we won't be able to solve the chicken and egg problem with a stroke of a feather, the slogan thing can be helpful to get the word out - and - it costs us virtually nothing. Just add the slogan to the title of our html pages.

Then it will read on google if you search for GNUstep: "GNUstep - code less, deploy everywhere" instead of "GNUstep - Everything is so ... square and gray. - They think we are retarded. They are retarded." (third hit currently if you google for GNUstep).

As they say in german: "Klingeln gehört zum Handwerk" (ringing the bell (e.g. making noise) is part of the business.)



I also like the idea of a "GNUstep planet", e.g. an aggregation of all GNUstep related blogs at the GNUStep website. The camino project has such a "planet": http://caminoplanet.org/ which is linked from http://caminobrowser.org/blog/. I check it regularly to see what happened. I virtually never check the GNUstep website since it never changes.

The message of such a planet is: We are working on it, something gets done, the project is alive and well.


If you build something that people want to install, users will show
up to work around deficiencies: packaging, porting, etc. New users
will make it easier for themselves, which makes it easier for others,
which causes an ecosystem to grow around it. I would guess that Ruby
(and Ruby's marketshare and mindshare) has been improved as a result
of Rails being the "Next Big Thing". GNUstep will only get into that
position by having unique, desirable applications built using it.

The problem here is that you're assuming people don't want to use GNUstep.

I think we already have a kind of could-be-killerapp: GNUstep-Web. It is even in the same category as RoR, developing web applications in an easy and fast way. But nearly nobody knows about it (as nobody knows about WebObjects (wherewith I earn my money) which is also widely unknown - but that's another story). I definitely prefer the WebObjects way of developing web apps to other web frameworks (and I know some, since I am currently doing contract work for another company which uses virtually every Java framework available (big mess if you ask me ;-)))

We can learn a lot from ruby on rails - for instance that they have no problem with advertising their stuff: They're doing webcasts of how easy RoR is to use and even stuff like this:

http://www.railsenvy.com/2007/5/16/hi-i-m-ruby-on-rails-part-3

The message is: Ruby on Rails is fun doing.


regards,

        Lars



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