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Re: How to get rid of *GNU Emacs* buffer on start-up?


From: Xah Lee
Subject: Re: How to get rid of *GNU Emacs* buffer on start-up?
Date: Fri, 19 Sep 2008 17:02:11 -0700 (PDT)
User-agent: G2/1.0

On Sep 19, 9:13 am, Nikolaj Schumacher <address@hidden> wrote:

> We just call them (scratch) buffers.  They provide all the
> same featuresXah's"untitled files" do.  Really, the only differences are
> nomenclature, the way of creating them and the fact that one exists by
> default.

That's not the only differences. I have given detail on other
differences.

Quote from my article:
http://xahlee.org/emacs/modernization_scratch_buffer.html

«
• There is no easy, intuitive way to create multiple scratch buffers.
(it is done by using the switch-to-buffer command (C-x b) and give
name that is not one of existing buffers.)

• Emacs does not provide a user level function to create a new buffer.
It has menu “File‣Open file...” (a wrapper to the find-file command),
which immediately prompt user for a full file path. This is annoying.
Modern apps's New File command actually just create a new untitled
file without prompting, and only when user save it it prompt a file
name. If user closes it, it prompts for saving.
»

and quote from my post here:

I don't agree that emacs does provide a user-level function for
creating a new buffer. The 2 practical methods to create a new buffer,
by find-file or switch-to-buffer, are both not designed to create a
new buffer for temp use, and each has serious problems in my opinion.

• There is no easy, intuitive way to create multiple scratch buffers.
(it is done by using the switch-to-buffer command (C-x b) and give
name that is not one of existing buffers.)

• Emacs does not provide a user level function to create a new
buffer.  It has “Open file...” (a wrapper to the find-file command),
which immediately prompt user for a full file path. This is annoying.
Modern apps's New File command actually just create a new untitled
file without prompting, and only when user save it it prompt a file
name.  If user closes it, it prompts for saving.

In summary: the problem with find-file is that it promps user to enter
a file name upfront. The problem with switch-to-buffer is that it
doesn't promp to save when user closes it. In both, the functions are
simply not designed for creating a new temp buffer.

  Xah
∑ http://xahlee.org/

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